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#4127276 - 11/09/21 07:04 AM Re: Jerry's Crown Victorias [Re: av8or1]
Old_Guy_Stu Offline

Over the Hill

Registered: 04/28/19
Posts: 2796
Loc: Cleveland, OH
Good job taking that cable. That's gotta be a hard part to find new.
_________________________

1988 CVLX Formal Roof (Love Boat) POTM July 2019, Aug 2020, & Oct 2021, 58K
E-code lights w/ relays, LEDs w/ switchbacks, 15x8 Ansen slots w/ 255/60 BFG's, Kenwood stereo, various hacks.
This, of course, was merely the semi-delirious notion of a fever-patient, but I remember that it struck me at the time as being eminently practical and feasible.

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#4127474 - 11/10/21 10:52 PM Re: Jerry's Crown Victorias [Re: Old_Guy_Stu]
av8or1 Offline

Over the Hill

Registered: 10/18/17
Posts: 1569
Loc: TX
Originally Posted By Old_Guy_Stu
Good job taking that cable. That's gotta be a hard part to find new.

Yeah that was the thought. These console shifter cables are obviously longer and thus not interchangeable with their column shift counterparts. I say that because I took a minute to examine the shifter cable in that 2002 GMQ LS that I found at the salvage yard on Monday. As I mentioned I pulled its dash too in order to remove the vacuum hoses. I was checking to see if the shifter cable in this column configuration was routed differently and if it indeed was shorter. Both of those assertions were accurate. And so the snatching of the cable from that 2001 GMQ LSE became paramount. And in the end, prophetic.

As fortune would so have it, the above notion of good-to-have would evolve into necessity. Why? Because the cable that was in Ol' Blue is, as it turns out, unusable. Yep. Unusable. I noticed it tonight when I did a formal comparison of the two entities:


However as I conducted my par-for-the-course thorough examination when reusing any given part, I noticed this on the cable that came with Ol' Blue:


That is 7 inches of full-on rusted cable and another 4 inches of sheathing damage beyond that. You gotta be kidding me! When will the horrors that have been lurking with this project end? Never? laugh

Humor aside I sat back and attempted to recall whether I could have done this upon removal. However when I thought about it I don't recall any issue occurring with the shifter cable removal process. Such as it becoming hung on something, etc. Instead I remember removing the retaining nut and bolts down below and then moving it up front, hanging it on the frame, there to remain for the foreseeable future. Then when the time came to paint the firewall, I pushed it through its dedicated opening in said firewall, no issues. In addition, when I looked at the damage tonight it was rather clear to me that this occurred over some period of time. I mean a single "hard pull" by someone attempting to remove the cable wouldn't have caused that type of wear. Nope, 'fraid this was/is just another data point in the slew of kruft that was. I digress.

Obviously then the cable from the 2001 GMQ LSE will be installed in Ol' Blue rather than the original fella. Interesting development.

Alright enough regarding that ... I have been slowly reassembling the various bits on the engine: PCV, CCV, brake booster vacuum hose, EVAP, EVAP hoses, etc. In these Panthers the EVAP purge solenoid rides on the wiper tray. I'd rather not attempt an engine start with it just dangling in free space. Therefore tonight I also began the process of sifting through the various spare parts piles to find the trays that I have on-hand, as well as their cowls. Found two of the trays that seemed worthy of hanging onto way-back-when:


Both motors appear to have seen their heyday, no question. They might work currently, but for how long? So no. I removed both and gave them to the lil' un for yet-more scrap metal. Have a replacement on-order. I don't need it in order to hang the tray itself and then the EVAP onto the tray, so I won't wait for that to arrive. Granted, installing the motor is easier with the tray removed. However the other way 'round really isn't that bad, so I'll just go about it with that approach. Anyway I chose the cleanest, best-conditioned tray, had the lil' un clean it (then I cleaned it laugh) scuffed it and put a touch of Hammered Black on 'er. 'Let that dry and we'll install it tomorrow. I was able to find the wiper tray h/w freezer bag, so that was a good thing. biggrin I digress.

So, a question: I have read various reports regarding this little "flapper door" that is found on the underside of the wiper tray:


Apparently it is notorious for remaining shut due to blockage (leaves, etc.) and thus flooding the tray. This flooding will leak onto the motor and cause various issues such as erratic operation or motor failure. I plan on applying some sealant to assist in preventing that. However I am curious if there is a remedy for the flapper door itself that the community has developed or is aware of? A couple of thoughts come to mind in that regard, with the most obvious being the simplicity of routine maintenance.

Thanks!


Edited by av8or1 (11/10/21 11:35 PM)
_________________________
2010 CVPI (Former TEXAS Highway Patrol vehicle) POTM April 2020 POTM June 2021 double thumbs
2006 LX Sport air ride delete (2)
2006 F450 SD 6.0L PSD CC LWB flatbed 4x4
1985 Mazda RX7 GSL-SE
1970 Plymouth Road Runner A383 pistol grip tick-tock buckets

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#4127568 - 11/11/21 10:53 PM Re: Jerry's Crown Victorias [Re: av8or1]
av8or1 Offline

Over the Hill

Registered: 10/18/17
Posts: 1569
Loc: TX
Completed a few minor odds-n-ends tonight:

1) Installed the windshield wiper tray.
2) Mounted the EVAP and its bracket to the wiper tray, which was the purpose of installing the tray now.
3) Connected the aft engine ground strap to the firewall (after sanding the connection point down to bare metal).
4) Installed the shifter cable from the 2001 GMQ LSE, which bolted into place without issue.
5) Connected the Continental shifter and left it outside the cabin for easy access during upcoming mini-projects. The lil' un was, of course, the first to shift the new transmission through the gears. I had manually (by hand) set the transmission to be in neutral prior to installing it. Verified that the tranny fella installed the parking pawl. laugh


I noticed that the new cable has an issue of its own. The locking/retaining tab on its fastener that mates to the console shifter's body is missing. Thus you can slide the fastener into place but it can slide right back up (and potentially out) of the body. The tab is designed to prevent that. The Continental shifter has the tab on its fastener however there is no means of transfer. At least not readily. And so at some point in the future I'll need to devise some type of locking mechanism to replace that missing tab. Shouldn't be a difficult task; a locking clip of some type would suffice. Anyway TBD.

Unfortunately that was the extent of the work that I could cram into the available time for tonight. Progress is progress. Inch by inch. biggrin


Edited by av8or1 (11/11/21 11:28 PM)
_________________________
2010 CVPI (Former TEXAS Highway Patrol vehicle) POTM April 2020 POTM June 2021 double thumbs
2006 LX Sport air ride delete (2)
2006 F450 SD 6.0L PSD CC LWB flatbed 4x4
1985 Mazda RX7 GSL-SE
1970 Plymouth Road Runner A383 pistol grip tick-tock buckets

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#4127658 - 11/13/21 01:06 AM Re: Jerry's Crown Victorias [Re: av8or1]
av8or1 Offline

Over the Hill

Registered: 10/18/17
Posts: 1569
Loc: TX
Well the AutoMeter stuff finally arrived at our doorstep this week. Tonight I decided to fiddle around with it, as this stuff involves the oil filter housing and thus needs to be installed prior to attempting a functional test of the drivetrain. First, "what's in the box":


That's oil pressure, volts and oil temp followed by the braided hose, from left to right. The primary item on the agenda was to conduct a dry fitment or "mock-up" to verify clearances. Prior to revealing anything about that though, a discussion of the approach that I plan on taking in regard to introducing both an oil pressure and temperature switch into the instrumentation seems in order. There are options available to you if you decide to do this, from electrical gauges to a manual configuration in which a braided line is ran through the firewall and onto the back of the gauge itself. And you don't need both gauges. Most implementations I've seen of this thing in a Panther only involve the oil pressure. For whatever reason I decided to include an oil temperature gauge as well. Then when I mentioned that I had considered a Voltmeter gauge but was leaning against it, Stu chimed in and suggested that I do that also. Good Ole Stu! laugh Anyway, you have to decide what is best for you.

So. I gave a few brain cycles to the subject, given that I would have three external gauges that I needed to contend with. The Voltmeter would be straightforward really, not much to discuss there. However given that I wanted both an oil pressure and an oil temperature gauge, well that complicated things a bit. Anyway after some consideration I came away with two ideas for how to go about the integration of the oil press/temp with the Ford OEM oil pressure switch:

1) Install a union (or "splitter" if you prefer) into the oil filter housing. Then run the OEM switch in one port and one end of the braided cable in the other (obviously via adapters). Route said braided cable to the inside of the driver's front frame rail. There it would enter another union ("splitter"). The oil pressure/temp sender/sensor would mate with that union. There is plenty of wire for both the switch and the oil press/temp, so electrical wasn't much of a concern.

2) Install one end of the braided cable into the oil filter housing (again, via adapters). Route said braided cable to the inside of the driver's front frame rail. There the cable would again serve as the supply/"input" to the union. However this union would have an additional port. You'd then install all three components: OEM pressure switch, oil pressure sender and oil temperature transducer/sensor into that union. Again, plenty of electrical wire to be utilized and I have more that I can splice in if that would become necessary. The distance alone wouldn't justify it, but if I needed to route the electrical around some other component, then maybe. Again though, I was not concerned with electrical.

My concern with #1 was the clearance with the power steering pump. That said, I decided to begin with an attempt to implement the first option:


That in and of itself was alright, but the 3' braided hose (which was the shortest variant that was available) would cause issues of varying types due to its length:


However that is easily overcome by sourcing a shorter braided line with appropriate fittings or else finding a suitable routing. No, the real issue remained the clearance. And so I decided to install the pump:


And with the engine bay wiring loom oil pressure switch connector mated to the new switch, the combination does clear:


But by the narrowest of margins. As a test of sorts I decided to wait to mate the two halves of the connectors together until the pump was installed. I was able to do that, but had to angle the connector at the start. Only after it was on the switch was there enough clearance for the connector to straighten out and slide on fully. In the end the electrical wire (WH-RD) would need to bend rather sharply as soon as it exited its connector housing in order to clear the pump's pulley. And you'd need to secure it rather well so as to avoid the two meeting up someday. "Why does it work then in the OEM configuration?" you might ask. Well that is because the OEM config doesn't include the union shown in the above picture. That union moves the switch from living right outside the housing with plenty of clearance from the pulley to a new home that is closer to the pulley. Thus creating a clearance problem/concern. So. Yeah. I sat back, stared at it a bit and had a think. I gave consideration to the notion that is most commonly expressed with a phrase such as "it'll be ok." And I looked at it a bit longer.

Nope. Don't like it fellas. Just can't run it like that. Therefore I will now need to take a look at option 2. However no time for that tonight. I had to get inside and assist with the lil' un, as per normal. Also, the union I have only has three ports in total. I'd need one with four. So I need to hop online in a bit to conduct a search for one of those critters (presuming that they can be had, TBD).

Finally, as an aside, in regard to where I will mount the gauges, for us there isn't much option other than below the radio as you would find in a Marauder. My wife would not have any dash or pillar mounted kruft. She green-lighted this additional side-project if you will with the stipulation that the gauges wouldn't be in her normal field of vision. And since I mentioned that the Marauder came from the factory with three gauges in the cubby, well she was fine with that. And so I will need to develop some means of converting the LX Sport cuddy into one that can accept gauges. I'll deal with that down the road. For present, I want to remained focused on preparing for the first engine start. I digress.

Alright, hope all is well!


Edited by av8or1 (11/13/21 01:28 AM)
_________________________
2010 CVPI (Former TEXAS Highway Patrol vehicle) POTM April 2020 POTM June 2021 double thumbs
2006 LX Sport air ride delete (2)
2006 F450 SD 6.0L PSD CC LWB flatbed 4x4
1985 Mazda RX7 GSL-SE
1970 Plymouth Road Runner A383 pistol grip tick-tock buckets

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#4127662 - 11/13/21 04:56 AM Re: Jerry's Crown Victorias [Re: av8or1]
Old_Guy_Stu Offline

Over the Hill

Registered: 04/28/19
Posts: 2796
Loc: Cleveland, OH
You're not going to get an accurate oil temp if you mount the sensor in a dead-end circuit, like at the end of a flex hose. You want oil actively flowing past it. Best place would be to weld a bung into the oil pan (didn't I see an extra one in your junkyard haul?) or one of the oil galleys in the block, if they're big enough.

A dead end is fine for pressure.
_________________________

1988 CVLX Formal Roof (Love Boat) POTM July 2019, Aug 2020, & Oct 2021, 58K
E-code lights w/ relays, LEDs w/ switchbacks, 15x8 Ansen slots w/ 255/60 BFG's, Kenwood stereo, various hacks.
This, of course, was merely the semi-delirious notion of a fever-patient, but I remember that it struck me at the time as being eminently practical and feasible.

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#4127672 - 11/13/21 11:17 AM Re: Jerry's Crown Victorias [Re: av8or1]
av8or1 Offline

Over the Hill

Registered: 10/18/17
Posts: 1569
Loc: TX
Oh sure, a temp sensor in that scenario gives you a ballpark at best, with slow reaction to change. However that will suffice for our needs. I might decide to do the oil pan thing but that'll be later down the line. Will not do the block thing. Did that once, regretted it later.

Thank you for the feedback!

UPDATE: Alright, I put a bung on-order today. I'll do the oil pan thing but as mentioned, not certain when just yet. Will install/weld it on the new "spare" pan I picked up last weekend and swap it out later down the road. While option 2 wasn't ideal, I was a-gonna let this one slide, since it would suffice for our needs. Friggin Stu! Can't let me step-foot into the world of "good enough." laugh


Edited by av8or1 (11/13/21 01:56 PM)
_________________________
2010 CVPI (Former TEXAS Highway Patrol vehicle) POTM April 2020 POTM June 2021 double thumbs
2006 LX Sport air ride delete (2)
2006 F450 SD 6.0L PSD CC LWB flatbed 4x4
1985 Mazda RX7 GSL-SE
1970 Plymouth Road Runner A383 pistol grip tick-tock buckets

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#4127698 - 11/13/21 08:13 PM Re: Jerry's Crown Victorias [Re: av8or1]
av8or1 Offline

Over the Hill

Registered: 10/18/17
Posts: 1569
Loc: TX
One of the yards I have been known to scrounge through just brought in a 2006 GMQ late this week. So I decided to take a punt by making a visit to see if it had anything I would be interested in grabbing. I could use with a better dash, for example, than the one that came in Ol' Blue, amongst other things. Alas no. This critter had been in an accident, with the impact point being the driver's front side. The mangling was rather extensive and pervaded into the cabin. No other items of interest caught my attention. With nothing newer than a 2003 CV in their yard at present, I made my way to the exit. Then, as if I was in a replay of last weekend I stopped to take a quick look at this 2003 CV:


Ho-hum, yeah whichever. That was until I peered inside:


Holy hell, it's a Sport! You gotta be kidding me! AND this particular Sport had/has the vacuum parking brake feature to boot, which means that there are vacuum lines on the pax side of its shifter. Wow. "I just did this, I mean how much of this kruft do I really need?" was the prevailing thought that was running through the cabbage upstairs. Gotta admit that I almost turned and walked away. However given the rareity of these parts I just couldn't do it. Nope, this entire lot would be coming home with me today, even if I didn't really need it. laugh

And so I set about the removal process. Just as an FYI, both the center console shifter cable and the vacuum line that runs to the parking brake run through the two fasteners shown in this picture:


I offer that tidbit of information because I mentioned in an earlier post that the shifter cable runs high along the firewall. This will give you an idea of just how high that is. So there is no way to remove this kruft without removing the dash. Or at least pulling it back enough to get your mitts in there. Interestingly, the style of the firewall pad on this 2003 differs from the one I have found in the later models. Wonder why and when the change happened? I suspect that the reason is cost related, but I digress.

And so this was my haul for the day:


Came away with nothing that I had set out to find, but lots of stuff that I didn't. Oh well, can't complain. Y'all take care!


Edited by av8or1 (11/13/21 08:32 PM)
_________________________
2010 CVPI (Former TEXAS Highway Patrol vehicle) POTM April 2020 POTM June 2021 double thumbs
2006 LX Sport air ride delete (2)
2006 F450 SD 6.0L PSD CC LWB flatbed 4x4
1985 Mazda RX7 GSL-SE
1970 Plymouth Road Runner A383 pistol grip tick-tock buckets

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#4127702 - 11/13/21 09:10 PM Re: Jerry's Crown Victorias [Re: av8or1]
Old_Guy_Stu Offline

Over the Hill

Registered: 04/28/19
Posts: 2796
Loc: Cleveland, OH
Originally Posted By av8or1
Friggin Stu! Can't let me step-foot into the world of "good enough." laugh


"Good enough" is an oil temp gauge that reads 90 degrees all the time?

You're getting quiet the collection of shifters!
_________________________

1988 CVLX Formal Roof (Love Boat) POTM July 2019, Aug 2020, & Oct 2021, 58K
E-code lights w/ relays, LEDs w/ switchbacks, 15x8 Ansen slots w/ 255/60 BFG's, Kenwood stereo, various hacks.
This, of course, was merely the semi-delirious notion of a fever-patient, but I remember that it struck me at the time as being eminently practical and feasible.

Top
#4127706 - 11/13/21 10:02 PM Re: Jerry's Crown Victorias [Re: av8or1]
av8or1 Offline

Over the Hill

Registered: 10/18/17
Posts: 1569
Loc: TX
Hah! Well I'd disagree slightly in that the gauge as configured in option 2 wouldn't read a consistent valve continuously. Granted, this approach would paint the oil temperature picture with broad-brush strokes, sure. And it wouldn't fluctuate with near the detail of a sensor that is mounted in the oil pan or block, I'll give ya that too. However the end-of-the-line scenario (option 2) would give the operator an indication of a large-scale issue with the engine. Such indication would be provided by a rising or already-high temperature needle. And that would be all that we (or I should say the wife-eee) would really want from such a gauge, practically speaking. I mean she just isn't-and-won't-be interested in knowing an accurate engine oil temperature value. As in ever. So in that context and for that reason placing the transducer in a terminating block would suffice for our application. That said, you would have to use the word "accuracy." That was enough to send me over the edge. I was willing to live with the rough-ballpark number that we would see via option 2 and for us, yes, that would have been "good enough." However the fact remains that I will drive Ol' Blue on occasion and if I look down I would like to see an accurate number. Thus it is for that reason alone that I'll do the oil pan thing. For the wife-eee, yeah not so much. As mentioned she won't care.

Yeah as of now I have more consoles than I need. However that is a nice problem to have.


Edited by av8or1 (11/13/21 10:06 PM)
_________________________
2010 CVPI (Former TEXAS Highway Patrol vehicle) POTM April 2020 POTM June 2021 double thumbs
2006 LX Sport air ride delete (2)
2006 F450 SD 6.0L PSD CC LWB flatbed 4x4
1985 Mazda RX7 GSL-SE
1970 Plymouth Road Runner A383 pistol grip tick-tock buckets

Top
#4127788 - 11/15/21 12:51 AM Re: Jerry's Crown Victorias [Re: av8or1]
av8or1 Offline

Over the Hill

Registered: 10/18/17
Posts: 1569
Loc: TX
Thought about returning to a salvage yard today, as there are parts that remain outstanding. However I decided to make progress with Ol' Blue instead. 'Continuing to prepare for the first start. I decided that I didn't want the various engine bay components just "hanging in the breeze" when I do this. With that decision came the need to complete other non-essential-to-starting-the-engine tasks. The installation of the windshield wiper tray being but one example. Well on this vintage of Panther the PCM lives on the driver's side inner fender/splash shield. To mount that you need to mount the fender. And so I decided to hang a few body parts today:


Kinda cool to see it looking like a real car again. However I have warned myself not to become too accustomed to the idea, for as soon as it is running again, it must come apart to prepare for paint. biggrin

You might recall that the driver's front fender was a replacement, definitely not originally DX paint (it was white) and definitely not original to the car. You might also remember that in one of my salvage yard runs I pulled every fender/hood/anything-n-everything off of an LX that was also Dark Blue Pearl (DX) and brought them home to the workshop. So after all of that I decided to re-use the original pax side front fender since it remains in good condition and is original to Ol' Blue. However I'll use the driver's side front fender from the donor car. The not-original-and-not-DX-color driver's side front fender that was on Ol' Blue will become a backup-to-a-backup. The pax fender of course lined up quite well:


And the paint was (obviously) a good match. The driver's side though ... well not so much:


The crest rides high, the top body line is set out just a tad and the paint on the fender is a lighter shade of DX. It also varies in patina ever so slightly. Such phenomenon is likely due to a different exposure/wear pattern over the years. I digress. All of that is to be expected when you mate panels from different vehicles, so not a surprise. Not a big deal either, all of the mismatched stuff can and will be sorted out when I do the body work later on. And the paint is irrelevant because I will paint the entire car. Good first fit overall though, I must say.

I decided to pull the core support in too. Might as well, though I'm certain that it will pick up a scratch or two in the process. Nothing a little scuffing and paint/clear can't fix. Although it is from a CVPI, the core support (of course) went in just as if it was built for this specific Panther:


Had family stuff happening throughout the day and was requested to man the grill in the evening. Still, I pressed ahead whenever I had a minute. By the time I needed to close-shop for the night, I left it here:


Both inner fenders mounted, PCM mounted and connected, engine bay harness ran, "power side" harness in (mostly) and pax side of the engine bay harness ran through the firewall and into the cabin. As always, I spent far too much time searching for stuff; on this occasion it was fasteners. "Where did the core support h/w run off to?" and the like. Eventually I found everything but gheez! Despite decent attempts to keep things organized, at times this project has seemed to be the opposite. Oh well, most every mega-build is like that. No need to complain, just keep your head down and plow forward.

Need to finish with the engine bay wiring then decide if I want to go all-in with running the water, etc. or just focus on the engine starting and running for a quite-short period of time. I don't have a replacement dash yet, so I'll need to reuse the one that I found in Ol' Blue for the time being. Whatever dash I use will of course have the display/MC that I can only guess/assume is original to the car. If I take the latter route, the idea is straightforward really. Merely connect/install the minimum amount of stuff necessary to start the engine. Then do so, running for a minute or two at most. Once I hear it run, I can pull everything (well most everything) apart again, paint and then complete the final assembly. I've not done this with a Panther yet, so I will need to take a stab at what is required. Seems straightforward enough, famous last words 'n all. laugh

Hope all is well!


Edited by av8or1 (11/15/21 01:01 AM)
_________________________
2010 CVPI (Former TEXAS Highway Patrol vehicle) POTM April 2020 POTM June 2021 double thumbs
2006 LX Sport air ride delete (2)
2006 F450 SD 6.0L PSD CC LWB flatbed 4x4
1985 Mazda RX7 GSL-SE
1970 Plymouth Road Runner A383 pistol grip tick-tock buckets

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#4127862 - 11/15/21 08:27 PM Re: Jerry's Crown Victorias [Re: av8or1]
SocalSam Offline
Over the Hill

Registered: 03/30/13
Posts: 3164
Loc: SFV, Calif.
It's true. Everything is BIGGER in Texas. Wish I had a shop like yours.
_________________________
2004 CV LX Sport #2, 121,000 miles -- Current
2008 CVPI Arizona Beige, 121,000 miles, 677 idle hours -- Current
Option Adds: Message Center Instrument Cluster , Re-Key Locks , Passenger Door Lock , Autolamps , Ballistic Panels


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#4128480 - 11/22/21 10:54 PM Re: Jerry's Crown Victorias [Re: av8or1]
av8or1 Offline

Over the Hill

Registered: 10/18/17
Posts: 1569
Loc: TX
Sam- Thank you for that. Yeah, great shop. The human condition is a curious thing ... I mean it's funny, I remember when I first purchased this property. Huge shop, great, I'm set. Then as life goes, you fill it up with various projects or whatever. Before you realize it, you're thinking the opposite of your original assessment: "What a small shop. I need something bigger!" biggrin

Well fellas I was making good strides towards a first start. However when I installed the custom power side harness that I had built by the fellas in AZ, I noticed that something was "just off" about it. After a closer look I noticed that the cable that ran to the starter was 1 ga and had a rubber cover cap, but for the primary only. By contrast the cable that ran to the alternator was 2 ga and had no rubber boot/cover. Wha-? Why would you have a heavier gauge cable running to the starter than the alternator, particularly when your alternator will (or can) generate more electrical power than stock, which was already considerable? And so I called and spoke with the owner. He agreed that it wasn't built correctly. With that I labelled the incorrect bits, described that on paper, then threw the paper and the harness into a box and shipped it back to AZ. With Thanksgiving transpiring this week there is no way that I'll have anything returned to me prior to then. As a result, I found myself in a holding pattern. The old harness wasn't good any longer, since the starter exciter wire was removed from it in order to splice it into this custom harness. DITW (Dead In The Water). Thus any progress in that regard would have to wait until I could hit a salvage yard over the weekend to pick up a new power side harness. nono Oh well.

Not being one to sit idly by if at all possible, I decided to o'er leap things just a tad. The idea being to tackle minor stuff that I would need to circle the wagons back 'round to eventually. The first one of those that came to mind was the firewall pad. You might recall that the one that came with Ol' Blue possessed all the Stank of Don Juan that it possibly could. While that has diminished over time and the "aeration" that it has received, it was/is still present. Albeit faintly. You might also recall that I pulled the dash on a 2008 (or 2010, don't recall now) CVPI and removed the pad from it during one of my salvage yard runs a while ago. Well, no time like the present, let's make the exchange. First the old stank pad:


Notice that I ripped out a section of it on the pax side some time ago, mostly out of frustration. biggrin Anyway, out it went:


Which left us with this:


That is a firewall that by all reasonable measure is in good condition. No rust, no holes of any size, not even any surface rust. To be clear that means that there is nothing to do here. Yes, I realize that. However, if you've read the thread for any length of time, you're likely aware that such a scenario is practically an invitation for me to do something. I'm especially prone to do stuff that you don't really need to do. Yeah, you could consider that a flaw or the like and I'd grant you that. To an extent anyway. But whatever it is in the realm of reasonable measure, this is how I roll. I couldn't just leave it like that. Nope, it got a cleaning, priming and some blue, mostly just 'cause:


The only "credit" I give to myself here was/is that I didn't use any of my DX paint. Ergo I didn't use "the good stuff" on a section of the body that will never, ever be seen again. Instead I used some of the Dark Navy Gloss that I still had lying around in the back corner of the paint/fluid cabinet. So there's that. laugh

I didn't proceed with the install of the new-to-us replacement pad from the CVPI though. From the outset I have planned on installing some cheaper variant of Dynamat in order to yield some type of heat protection as well as to improve the ride experience through sound dampening. So why not run some here underneath this pad? After a quick 10-minute research session into more reasonably priced variants of Dynamat, I settled on a product named "HushMat'. I ordered a bundle of it, which is supposed to arrive any day now. The plan is to lay that down, then the pad, then re-install some of the controls that I removed in order to rid ourselves of what is hopefully that last of the Stank of Don Juan. Namely the brake and accelerator pedals, as well as the steering arm bearing. And speaking of the pedals, well, since I needed to kill time this past week, I decided to give them the treatment too:


Not much to be done with the accelerator, but the brake pedal bracket could use some of the blue stuff on the bracket and black on the pedal:


'Cause yeah, it needed it. rolleyes laugh Oh well, no DX paint wasted here, just the Dark Navy Gloss that I'd prefer to consume anyway, so...

Then I decided to consider the intake, 'cause it was also looking rather old and tired. So I set out all of the LX pieces-n-parts that I had lying around, to include the crap that was in Ol' Blue (which is on the left in the following picture):


From a way-long-ago post, you might recall the gargantuan hole in the friggin air box that I yanked out of Ol' Blue. Yeah. Well somehow I still had that mess lying off in the corner. Not sure why, though I probably just tossed it aside in mild disgust. Anyway that excuse for a box (and HOW did that hole come to be anyway???) and the nasty, crasty filter that occupied the space therein summarily found their way into the bin. biggrin

So I took the best of the bits that remained, removed the retaining clamps and gave them a day at the spa:


I then spruced up the forward engine crash bracket in Hammered Black ('cause again, it needs it - lol), reinstalled the intake retaining clamps onto the intake and installed all of that into the engine bay:


Anything 'n everything to fill the time, right? laugh

Alright so the weekend rolled 'round but I couldn't get to a yard until Sunday. That was a good day in that I was able to snatch several parts that I needed, to include a new power side harness. In retrospect, I should have opted to limit the amount of cable that I removed to include only the starter exciter, then solder that into the original power harness that I ripped out of Ol' Blue. Cheaper that way. Unfortunately I was not clairvoyant enough to make that happen, and purchased the entire harness. Uuuggghhhh. And prior to leaving this subject, know that Ford introduced a new exciter connecter pair (which rides on the pax side inner fender/splash shield) sometime after 2006. I think that the connector I removed on Sunday was from a 2010. But whatever it was from, that connector is a larger one and can accommodate two spade terminals. By contrast, the connector pair from the 2006 CV is smaller in size and only has the one spade terminal. So they are not interchangeable. That'll teach me not to actually LOOK at the connector prior to scavenging one from a yard now, won't it? laugh So yeah. I still do not have the means to start the engine at this point, short of hot-wiring something, which I don't want (and will not) do. Thus I need to hit another yard prior to Thursday to hunt for a single-spade-terminal connector. The yard I went to on Sunday didn't have a CV that was older than 2008 anyway, so I suspect that I'd be OOL regardless. I suspect that the change happened in 2007, like many others that came along that year. Of course I don't know that yet, so TBD there. However it's sliced though, I need a period-correct starter exciter connector. And wouldn't ya know it but I didn't make this discovery until tonight when I went to solder in the new connector. Good times!

Had I known about the situation just described, I would have taken a look during today's salvage yard run. I went to a different yard, one that doesn't have a CV newer than 2003. You might recall that the last time I was there (a little over a week ago as I recall) I came across a 2003 LX Sport:


From which I removed the center console despite not really needing it. Well, while I was there I recalled noticing that this particular Sport had an electrically-opened fuel door. And since - again - I hadn't yet made the starter exciter connector discovery (sigh) I was focused on bringing that home today. "Why?" you might ask. Fair question. Mostly because I've not yet seen that on any CV or GMQ to-date, at least not that I can recall. Furthermore, its inclusion would be another extra touch in this build. And finally the wife-eee liked the idea. And so out I went today. I found it still there, just as though it knew to wait for me to return:


Since the yards around here do not allow battery packs of any type and since the wires to the driver's side door had been cut long-ago (the door was lying in the Mustang next door I might add), there wouldn't be any use in attempting to power it open. "Surely it has some type of manual opening capability if it is a factory product" I thought. I looked in the cabin but came up empty. Although I had brought a sawzall with me, I decided to see if there would be a better way of opening this critter without "going all caveman" on it from the get-go. As it turns out, a simple flat-head screw driver slid through the aft part of the door and a small jab is enough to release the latch. Hrrrmpph! So much for the "security" that the wife-eee was in favor of with the introduction of such a fuel door:


But oh well, I was a-gonna bring it home anyway. And of course when I removed the housing I discovered that yep, there is a manual release for the door; it resides in the trunk. laugh Oh well, I couldn't be too disappointed in myself for not finding that, as I am not familiar with this particular implementation and most manual fuel door releases that I've seen, installed or been familiar with locate/situate/configure their triggering mechanism somewhere near the driver's seat. Not in the trunk. But I digress. Anyhoo, I removed the lot of it, to include a generous pigtail. This was the day's haul:


I decided to bring home the somewhat-beaten-up door panel (sans control sub-panel, for the yard charges an arm-and-a-leg for that type of stuff and I don't need it) simply because it had/has these "cool" placards for the respective switches:


Yeah. I went full-geek on this one. laugh Anyway I'll deal with all of this bit later on down the road. Just more fodder until I can proceed with the engine start business. The package is supposed to arrive in AZ tomorrow. I'll see if they are willing to do a rush job on it, but am not too optimistic. I'll see if I can steal away to hit a (different) yard that has a 2006 hanging out. TBD. And while we're on the subject, do any of y'all know how common or rare it is to see an electrically actuated fuel door on a Panther? I'd kinda-halfway-sorta expect to see it on an LTC, but again I've never seen it on either a CV or a GMQ.

Hope all is well. If I don't post prior to then, I wish y'all a Happy Thanksgiving!


Edited by av8or1 (11/22/21 11:49 PM)
_________________________
2010 CVPI (Former TEXAS Highway Patrol vehicle) POTM April 2020 POTM June 2021 double thumbs
2006 LX Sport air ride delete (2)
2006 F450 SD 6.0L PSD CC LWB flatbed 4x4
1985 Mazda RX7 GSL-SE
1970 Plymouth Road Runner A383 pistol grip tick-tock buckets

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#4128504 - 11/23/21 12:30 AM Re: Jerry's Crown Victorias [Re: av8or1]
SocalSam Offline
Over the Hill

Registered: 03/30/13
Posts: 3164
Loc: SFV, Calif.
I've looked at the powered gas door many times but decided against because it is welded in. Not a problem with a monster shop but I rock in a car port, welp. Since any thief worth his hoodie carries a flat head screw driver, the powered door is just as secure and the manual door. This being said, it's an option I want, lol.
_________________________
2004 CV LX Sport #2, 121,000 miles -- Current
2008 CVPI Arizona Beige, 121,000 miles, 677 idle hours -- Current
Option Adds: Message Center Instrument Cluster , Re-Key Locks , Passenger Door Lock , Autolamps , Ballistic Panels


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#4128702 - 11/25/21 01:01 AM Re: Jerry's Crown Victorias [Re: SocalSam]
av8or1 Offline

Over the Hill

Registered: 10/18/17
Posts: 1569
Loc: TX
Originally Posted By SocalSam
I've looked at the powered gas door many times but decided against because it is welded in. Not a problem with a monster shop but I rock in a car port, welp. Since any thief worth his hoodie carries a flat head screw driver, the powered door is just as secure and the manual door. This being said, it's an option I want, lol.

A welded fuel door? Interesting. Well, the CV fuel door is not welded (at least not on the handful+ of variants at which I have taken a closer look at one point or another) so if you come across one like this, then yeah, I'd recommend snatching it. My plan to remedy the opening-via-flathead-screwdriver is to add some material to close the gap between the door and the car body on the aft section of the fuel door. With that in-play there would be no means of sliding anything flat in that gap. Granted, if someone wants to get in your fuel door to pour some crap down your filler neck and into your tank, they're a-gonna get in; this "fix" would merely be a deterrent to make them move onto an easier target (or so the hope goes). That and it seems like a cool little side project. As if I don't have enough of those dontchaknow. laugh

In other news, the HushMat stuff arrived today:


So we decided to install it on the firewall. The lil' un insisted on helping:


Applying this stuff is kinda like arts-n-crafts that you do as a kid in elementary school, what with the measuring, drawing lines and cutting and such. He recognized that immediately and so I sat back and allowed him to do the bulk of the work. Well kinda. biggrin Anyway we had that laid down in nothing flat:


We'll do the entire floor, the doors and the roof in due time. For now we wanted to simply cover the firewall. The purpose being to install the new-to-us firewall pad over said HushMat:


Again, I pulled that pad from a 2008 (or 2010) CVPI in a long-ago salvage yard run. You KNOW that the Stank of Don Juan was a most malodorous air if the pad from a wrecked CVPI in a salvage yard did better on a sniff test than the one that came in Ol' Blue! That indeed was the case. laugh

Anyway I wrapped the electrical in some of the new-fangled tape while I was at it, replaced a couple of the suspension fasteners and replaced a missing captive fastener (one of the three that assist in securing the dash to the firewall). I also readied the brake and accelerator pedals for re-installation. We had to leave it there for the night, but I plan on finishing that minor task tomorrow after Thanksgiving lunch.

And speaking of that, y'all have a tremendous Thanksgiving holiday!


Edited by av8or1 (11/25/21 01:07 AM)
_________________________
2010 CVPI (Former TEXAS Highway Patrol vehicle) POTM April 2020 POTM June 2021 double thumbs
2006 LX Sport air ride delete (2)
2006 F450 SD 6.0L PSD CC LWB flatbed 4x4
1985 Mazda RX7 GSL-SE
1970 Plymouth Road Runner A383 pistol grip tick-tock buckets

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#4128904 - 11/28/21 02:16 AM Re: Jerry's Crown Victorias [Re: av8or1]
av8or1 Offline

Over the Hill

Registered: 10/18/17
Posts: 1569
Loc: TX
Quick update ... I spoke with the fella in AZ regarding the power side harness. He tells me that they have corrected the issues and that they would return it to me today (Friday). Thus I have decided to just wait for it to arrive prior to attempting a first start of the engine. In the meantime I've continued to do other small tasks in order to fill the time productively. I've already mentioned the firewall work. Another example was a connector on the driver's side of the engine bay. It connects the engine and engine bay harnesses respectively. Well in 2006 this was a swivel lock variant, like those that mate to the PCM. However it also has a small tab that locks the swivel lever into position. And wouldn't ya know it but that tab was broken on Ol' Blue's (engine) harness. Sigh. Fortunately during the most recent salvage yard run I was able to snatch a replacement from another 2006. It was a CVPI but the harness connector was identical. Anyway I swapped the two via de-pinning and re-pinning one terminal at a time. Yet another inherited fire that we've had to contend with. While it is small potatoes in the big picture, it is important and so thumbs up for that result.

Alright so there has been an elephant in the room for me the past few days, though it may not have been transparent. If you recall, there is the notion of an oil temperature gauge. I have had a few ideas for how to tackle that one. The latest was to accept a less-than-ideal solution of simply adding it to the block/union on the inside of the frame. While that may not yield the best results, it would get you in the ballpark-ish and be enough to surface any large-scale issues, which is all that the wife-eee would want it to do. However I found that I was having difficulty leaving it at that. Thus during the past few days I've been toying with different strategies. One was simply installing a bung in the oil pan. That would do it, surely, though I must admit that I wasn't completely-captivated with the idea. I mean there are technical issues involved with welding a bung to a relatively thin piece of material such as an oil pan. Not the least of which is how the HAZ (Heat Affected Zone) will spread, how it will affect the surrounding metal and whether or not that would lead to a crack somewhere down the line. For funzzies mostly I picked up a couple of spare pans during the aforementioned salvage yard run. And I have been using those pans as test subjects. I found that I could drill the hole, insert the bung and weld the two together without much issue. 'Even did it with FCAW of all things on one of the tests. TIG was the top performer though because I could focus and control the heat much better (obviously). I subjected the result to a pressure test and a duration test. It passed both. I feel confident that it would have worked, at least for the short term. No telling how the road might twist in regard to the HAZ though. Therefore, in the end, for reasons of longevity and for the fact that to remove the existing pan would require elevating the engine (and thus doing a considerable amount of what I refer to as "back work" - which means undoing work that you have already completed) I decided against proceeding with the exchange.

Mind you, I once saw a fella install a bung without removing the pan, 'just right there on his Jeep (I think it was). However his brazen approach didn't gain much traction with me. No good way of cleaning the metal shavings out of the pan that come about as a result of drilling the hole. He wasn't concerned with it, and I understood his rationale. That said, I was concerned with it and wouldn't attempt that approach either then or now. So I chose to forego that notion as well. Hmmmmmm...what to do then?

I sat back and had a think. I mean what was the problem that lead me down this rabbit trail anyway? The problem is this notion of a terminating temperature sensor configuration. For our purposes such a design would suffice. But surely we could do better, couldn't we? There is no way I am a-gonna create a new hole in the engine block, so that idea is not on the radar. The only thing left then would be to utilize an existing port on the oil filter housing. Or create a new one. As it turns out there is no additional port on the housing that can be commandeered for this purpose. And so I decided to play around with it a bit to see if there was anything that could be had.

It is at this point that I must admit to allowing excitement and enthusiasm get the better of me. I say that because I made an observation when looking at the oil filter housings that I have on-hand:


There is a fastener that literally threads into a hole in the housing. You can see both the fastener and the port/hole in the above picture. Hah! This fastener holds the wiring that runs to the OEM pressure switch and the power steering rack in position. What if we were to secure said wiring by other means and use this hole to create a port into which we could thread the temp sensor? Great idea, right? I mean drilling the hole and tapping it should be straightforward enough:


And yeah it was. 'Cept this idea is fundamentally flawed. The flaw occurred to me while tapping the new port hole. And once the enthusiasm settled down just a bit. Even though the realization that it was not a-gonna work had finally dawned on me, I decided to finish off the tapping of the hole. I'd come this far dontchaknow. And this housing was selected to be the testbed, so no big deal there. Anyway the problem is clearance. You see, the oil filter housing mounts to the block immediately aft of the power steering pump:


You can see the four power steering pump bolts and the electrical fastener on the side of the oil filter housing in the above picture. And simply by looking at the relation of the pump and the housing in said photo, it becomes obvious that there is absolutely no room for a temp sensor to take over the digs of that fastener. For further illustration, I mounted the pump:


Yeah. FAIL. Sigh. Alright that's out. Are there any other possibilities? I looked around the housing and noticed another boss that lived just above the ports that run to the actual cooler. It didn't possess the height of the other bosses on the housing, but it seemed worthy of consideration:


In order to evaluate the location/idea, I drilled and tapped a new 1/8" NPT port on that boss. Dunno fellas. On one side of the port there are 5 or 6 threads. However on the other there were only 3 or 4:


Although it worked:


And would avoid any clearance issues that I had been experiencing with previous ideas, the lower thread count wasn't sitting well with me. Furthermore this particular sensor is somewhat lengthy after its threads (ergo it has a long tail if you will), it would protrude into the canal/passage rather noticeably. By contrast the OEM oil pressure switch, which threads into the other port, has a much smaller footprint into that same passage. Not certain that it even protrudes into said passage in fact. With those complications in mind, I "wasn't feelin' it" as the phrase goes.

With no other suitable bosses or obvious locations on the oil filter housings at which a port could be fashioned and the need to take the lil' un inside for the night, I chose to table the concept for the time being. Ergo punt. For now anyway.

Mind you, none of this will be relevant to the first engine start. As the picture above shows, I have the OEM pressure switch threaded into the port for which it was designed and its electrical connector mated. That is the configuration in which it will remain until after said engine testing. Again, all of this aforementioned business is fodder to fill time while I wait on the power side harness to return from AZ. And speaking of that, since it is on its way back I should reinstall the dash or at least the stuff I need from it in order to prepare for the pending test.

I digress. Hope all is well and that y'all had a good Thanksgiving holiday!


Edited by av8or1 (11/28/21 04:00 AM)
_________________________
2010 CVPI (Former TEXAS Highway Patrol vehicle) POTM April 2020 POTM June 2021 double thumbs
2006 LX Sport air ride delete (2)
2006 F450 SD 6.0L PSD CC LWB flatbed 4x4
1985 Mazda RX7 GSL-SE
1970 Plymouth Road Runner A383 pistol grip tick-tock buckets

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