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#4116092 - 07/24/21 12:04 AM Re: Jerry's Crown Victorias [Re: av8or1]
av8or1 Offline

Over the Hill

Registered: 10/18/17
Posts: 1500
Loc: TX
After two or three days of drying, the fuel tank was ready to paint/bedline. The first order of business however was to remove the residual matting of the previous/original heat shields. 'Had to break out the chemicals for that. With a judicious application of lacquer thinner though, the tank saw things my way:


Afterwards the bedliner went on without incident:


I picked up the new studs, vacuum reservoir and fuel limiting (vent) valve from the dealership today. With any luck, favorable wx and time I should be able to install the tank by the end of the weekend. TBD.


Edited by av8or1 (07/24/21 12:05 AM)
_________________________
2010 CVPI (Former TEXAS Highway Patrol vehicle) POTM April 2020 POTM June 2021 double thumbs
2006 LX Sport air ride delete (2)
2006 F450 SD 6.0L PSD CC LWB flatbed 4x4
1985 Mazda RX7 GSL-SE
1970 Plymouth Road Runner A383 pistol grip tick-tock buckets

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#4116244 - 07/25/21 03:43 PM Re: Jerry's Crown Victorias [Re: av8or1]
av8or1 Offline

Over the Hill

Registered: 10/18/17
Posts: 1500
Loc: TX
Yesterday I continued with the fuel tank stuff. I found this pre-fabbed vapor tube/hose product online:


And decided to opt for it, since it would save a considerable amount of time versus fabricating my own. That said I am not a fan of these style of hose clamps:


And would have preferred to see a different choice made when they put this together. Granted, those clamps do work and Ford used them in fact. I just prefer the old-school hose clamps that you can cinch to a given tightness with either a flat head or a small socket. And so I used one of those on the other end of this hose, which runs to the fuel limiting valve (vent valve/tank pressure reg):


And once done the new fellas came out looking like they had been on top of the tank all of their lives:


But ... but ... just as I suspected when I purchased the thing, the pressure tank sensor is different and won't mate to the existing wiring harness connector:


And so the work isn't quite done yet. I'll need to swap these two or even possibly find a new instance of the sensor that came on the tank and swap that in instead. TBD. For that reason I won't be able to install the tank this weekend. It wouldn't have mattered though, the new fuel tank heat shields didn't arrive at the dealership yesterday. Thus I can't pick those up untl this coming week. So the tank wouldn't have gone in today regardless. And if I opt for a new sensor, well ...

Anyway take care!


Edited by av8or1 (07/25/21 03:46 PM)
_________________________
2010 CVPI (Former TEXAS Highway Patrol vehicle) POTM April 2020 POTM June 2021 double thumbs
2006 LX Sport air ride delete (2)
2006 F450 SD 6.0L PSD CC LWB flatbed 4x4
1985 Mazda RX7 GSL-SE
1970 Plymouth Road Runner A383 pistol grip tick-tock buckets

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#4116532 - 07/28/21 10:46 PM Re: Jerry's Crown Victorias [Re: av8or1]
av8or1 Offline

Over the Hill

Registered: 10/18/17
Posts: 1500
Loc: TX
Tonight's installment begins with the fuel tank. First is the pressure sensor. The one that came on Ol' Blue has been discontinued, at least from Ford it has. I was not able to find one at-large either. So that's that. I'll have to find a way of removing the one that came on the tubing I purchased and install Ol' Blue's sensor in its place. Then keep an eye out for a 2006- Panther during future salvage yard runs to see if I can snatch one to serve as a spare (not that the likelihood of ever needing is all that probable, but ...). The sensor exchange won't be easy since that is molded tubing. I may have to cut it, remove the newer sensor, install the old one, then cinch it down with hose clamps. TBD. I couldn't get around to addressing that issue tonight however. The Darkness arrived all too soon, even at this high-trajectory time of year.

The new heat shields arrived today, so I gave them a test fit:


I ordered 3 cans of high temp adhesive from an online source and must wait for those to arrive. Couldn't resist a test fit in the interim though!

So the bulk of the night was spent sanding the firewall in preparation for paint. This is where I began:


The Darkness precluded an after picture, so that'll have to wait. Nothing much to see anyway. I hit it with 80 tonight. Will follow up with 180, 220 and then 320. 'Probably leave it at that; I doubt I'll go to 400 or 600 on a firewall. This portion of the vehicle is particularly time consuming and must be done by hand. No D/A on this body panel; just too many valleys, welded brackets, etc. I'm thinking that I'll just leave the bedliner where it is in the picture and paint above it. The stuff around the tranny tunnel will be covered by the firewall's made-over heat shield anyway.

That's all I have; work has been crazy-busy as of late. Hope all is well!


Edited by av8or1 (07/28/21 10:49 PM)
_________________________
2010 CVPI (Former TEXAS Highway Patrol vehicle) POTM April 2020 POTM June 2021 double thumbs
2006 LX Sport air ride delete (2)
2006 F450 SD 6.0L PSD CC LWB flatbed 4x4
1985 Mazda RX7 GSL-SE
1970 Plymouth Road Runner A383 pistol grip tick-tock buckets

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#4117148 - 08/04/21 12:29 AM Re: Jerry's Crown Victorias [Re: av8or1]
av8or1 Offline

Over the Hill

Registered: 10/18/17
Posts: 1500
Loc: TX
Bit of a side story type of update tonight. I knew that Da Beast's master cylinder was in need of replacement. And since we're driving it more often than in previous years, usually with the family in-tow I decided it was time to complete that task. Shouldn't take more than a couple of hours maximum, right? Technically yes, practically no. Ever had a seemingly trivial project snowball on you once you began? Well this one sure did. I was able to remove and replace the master in about an hour. So far so good. Then came time to bleed the always-rusty-crusty calipers that you find on most vehicles that have any miles on them. Sure enough 3 out of the 4 simply refused to cooperate:


The usual fare ensued; the bleeder rounds off despite using the correctly-sized wrench. At that point nothing you attempt actually enables the critters to unthread. Usually it's game over at that point. So in the end I replaced not one, not two but three calipers simply because I didn't want to mess about after the respective bleeders had rounded off during the initial attempt to remove them:


That is to say that I decided to forego the usual attempts at a remedy (heat, hammer on an old-and-too-small socket, etc.) and just buy new calipers (that come with new bleeders) instead. And of course, the ever-present "while I'm here" syndrome came into play so I replaced the pads while I was at it. The rotors were in good condition, so I let those be. Anyway that consumed the weekend, what with all of the customary interruptions. All that said and done, I still couldn't bleed the brakes in the end because the bleeders that came on these friggin CarQuest (made in China) calipers won't accept a vaccum tube. And I prefer to bleed via that process. Well bunk. So that is a long way 'round to stating that I decided to source some speed bleeders for the F450. While I was at it, I also purchased a set for both Ol' Blue and The 5-O. I'll use The 5-O as the testbed to verify operation (knowing full-well that they'll work, that's more of an excuse to put them on my daily than anything laugh) and then install them on Ol' Blue afterward. Will post the results.

Alright so while I am waiting for the speedies to arrive, I resumed work on Ol' Blue tonight. Needing something that could be done in the little time available, I turned my attention to the fuel tank. It was beyond time to finish this task completely. I decided to go with a Motorcraft OEM replacement fuel pump and assembly. That came in late last week. The high-temp adhesive arrived today and so the remainder of the work was green-lighted. Here it is in all its glory:


New shields attached with the adhesive (note that the shields are also self-adhesive, so I did a double-dip), new fuel pump with new pigtails that run all the way to the connectors and then to round out the work I removed the old fuel tank pressure sensor and installed the original one that came with Ol' Blue. That was an interesting means to determine that the original vapor hose was of a larger diameter than the new. Yup, as soon as I crammed one end of the sensor into the molded tubing (which I had to cut in order to remove the sensor that came with the product), the split in the tubing enlargened. I continued to fully seat the sensor. Thus I needed to make a repair. In the end I found some black colored Gorilla tape, which felt a bit like a vapor barrier on its inside surface, so I wrapped that around the affected area. Its adhesion is good. However I followed that with a hose clamp and then electrical tape on the outside of that. I am hoping that this ad-hoc configuration will contain the fuel vapors so that they don't enter the cabin. It should hold, but TBD.

Anyway gotta run, hope all is well!


Edited by av8or1 (08/04/21 12:32 AM)
_________________________
2010 CVPI (Former TEXAS Highway Patrol vehicle) POTM April 2020 POTM June 2021 double thumbs
2006 LX Sport air ride delete (2)
2006 F450 SD 6.0L PSD CC LWB flatbed 4x4
1985 Mazda RX7 GSL-SE
1970 Plymouth Road Runner A383 pistol grip tick-tock buckets

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#4117156 - 08/04/21 06:26 AM Re: Jerry's Crown Victorias [Re: av8or1]
Old_Guy_Stu Offline

Over the Hill

Registered: 04/28/19
Posts: 2557
Loc: Cleveland, OH
Pro Tip: Use anti-sieze on the bleeder threads.

I think that taped vapor line will give you some grief down the road. Not too many adhesives play nice with gasoline or its fumes. Rubber hose would be a better solution.
_________________________

1988 CVLX Formal Roof (Love Boat) POTM July 2019 & Aug 2020, 56K
E-code lights w/ relays, LEDs w/ switchbacks, 15x8 Ansen slots w/ 255/60 BFG's, Kenwood stereo, various hacks.

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#4117174 - 08/04/21 11:06 AM Re: Jerry's Crown Victorias [Re: av8or1]
av8or1 Offline

Over the Hill

Registered: 10/18/17
Posts: 1500
Loc: TX
Hey Stu-

Thank you for the feedback! Yeah, I always put anti-sieze on the threads of the bleeders that I can manage to remove. You can't control what folks did before you though; whoever installed these sure as heck didn't use any and it showed. That's the way it goes sometimes. You can only control you, and so I'll apply the stuff on the new speed bleeders for Da Beast, The 5-O and Ol' Blue. Certainly.
beer1

As for the vapor tubing, I'd agree that this approach is less than ideal. Thus my commentary of it being an ad-hoc approach. However rubber tubing would have been a challenge in this case due to the different diameters of the components that it would attach to. Hose clamps can solve that to a certain degree, but depending on the size differential (which I didn't measure) it would have been less than ideal too. I might spend a little time searching for some tubing options online a bit later though, TBD.


Edited by av8or1 (08/04/21 11:07 AM)
_________________________
2010 CVPI (Former TEXAS Highway Patrol vehicle) POTM April 2020 POTM June 2021 double thumbs
2006 LX Sport air ride delete (2)
2006 F450 SD 6.0L PSD CC LWB flatbed 4x4
1985 Mazda RX7 GSL-SE
1970 Plymouth Road Runner A383 pistol grip tick-tock buckets

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#4117548 - 08/08/21 12:04 PM Re: Jerry's Crown Victorias [Re: av8or1]
357cvpi Offline
n00b

Registered: 11/13/20
Posts: 40
Loc: UT
Hello all, quick question, will the bedliner under the car ever cause hidden corrosion problems the way rubberized undercoat will? Great thread, can't wait for the finished product. Thanks

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#4117604 - 08/08/21 09:14 PM Re: Jerry's Crown Victorias [Re: av8or1]
Old_Guy_Stu Offline

Over the Hill

Registered: 04/28/19
Posts: 2557
Loc: Cleveland, OH
Not if it's properly applied over a clean surface. Rubberized undercoating dries out over time and water gets up in the cracks. Bedliner is urethane-based, like your bumper cover. The jury's still out on how long urethane lasts; it was only invented in the 1970s.
_________________________

1988 CVLX Formal Roof (Love Boat) POTM July 2019 & Aug 2020, 56K
E-code lights w/ relays, LEDs w/ switchbacks, 15x8 Ansen slots w/ 255/60 BFG's, Kenwood stereo, various hacks.

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#4117612 - 08/09/21 01:38 AM Re: Jerry's Crown Victorias [Re: av8or1]
av8or1 Offline

Over the Hill

Registered: 10/18/17
Posts: 1500
Loc: TX
I concur with Stu WRT bedliner versus undercoating. Fortunately I live in a relatively dry climate and thus no salt on the roads during our "winter". Thus for me, this is more of a peace-of-mind thing. I won't sweat it as much if the wife has to drive down a gravel road for example.

At present I am still debating regarding the fuel hose issue. TBD. And yesterday I noticed that the hydroboost on Da Beast was leaking, so the hope of only replacing the master cylinder disappeared quickly. Thus I spent the day working on that, primarily because the parts store fella told me that the replacement hydroboost unit that he sells comes with the bracket. Bought it, got it home, opened the box only to discover that yeah-no, it doesn't come with the bracket. Uuugggghhh. Tried to remove the existing one but without the special tool, good luck removing that 47 mm nut that is surrounded by 4 studs. After futzing around with that for longer than I should have, we returned the unit to the parts store. Last night I ordered one online that *does* include the bracket. And since I must wait on that, I revisited Ol' Blue today.

Decided to finish the firewall business, thus the only item that would remain are the fuel hose issue and the installation of the tank. At that point I could/can *finally* reunite the body with the frame. And that is something that I am keen to complete. So the firewall. What remains is to paint the thing. I mentioned this several (well many) posts ago, but I invested in a couple of new HVLP guns, as the ones I used in the 90s/00s are long gone. I went with DeVilbliss, middle-of-the-road-but-good quality. I also ordered the primer/sealer, DX base and Euro clear from an online source. So it was time. Unfortunately this Sunday was not a good day to be painting outdoors. It was kinda windy (not terribly) and so there would be no good means of containing/preventing your work from being compromised. However as I have also mentioned, I'm aiming for a 5-feet-away paint job; a task that IMHO is manageable given the conditions in which I found myself. Thus I proceeded. This past week saw relatively little time to work on the project as a whole. By the time I ventured out to the workshop darkness was only an hour or so away. Thus each night I sanded the firewall with one of the progressive grits. I had considered merely scuffing it, but decided to do a full sand job instead. I stuck with the standard plan, beginning with 80 and ending with 320. All done by hand given the nature of the beast. So after 5 nights the sanding was checked off of the to-do list.

So where to begin? Well task one was deciding how the landscape/canvas was a-gonna look. I had been debating as to whether or not I'd remove the vacuum booster and HVAC unit or just paint around them. I noticed rust on the booster and general age issues with the HVAC unit, so I decided to do the full Monty: I would remove those now with the intention of replacing them entirely with new equivalents when the time comes. Yup, even those will be new on the wife's ride. laugh

First thing was first: remove the booster. If you aren't familiar with this, the removal is had from the inside and begins with four 13 mm bolts that are the means by which the unit is held to the firewall. Those are removed as the initial step. You then must contend with the mechanism by which the brake pedal is attached to the vacuum booster's plunger. On these vehicles (and other Ford models I've seen - to include our F450), this is accomplished via a rod that extends from the brake pedal on the driver's side. That rod runs through the end of the plunger and through the brake light switch. There is a yellow cover that is placed over the entire sub-assembly in order to assist in preventing the un-doing of the arrangement:


Not much to the cover really, though it serves an important purpose:


That removed you can see the pin and rod (or dowel if you prefer) clearly, thus:


The plunger can be seen to the left of the rod in the above picture. The pin is removed with run-of-the-mill needle nosed pliars:


You then pry the end of the plunger towards the driver's side. Both the rod and the brake light switch slide off of that rod. At that point the booster is free and can be removed from the vehicle:


That done it was time to remove the HVAC unit from the home it has known since birth:


And then proceed with the final paint prep. It was at that point that I noticed a slight crease in the firewall on the driver's side, immedately below the opening for one of the two primary electrical connectors:


I checked The 5-O to verify these, thinking that they aren't supposed to be present. I didn't feel #2 but did feel a slight crease where #1 is indicated in the above picture. No problem, the only concern was with the usual fight against darkness. However, I couldn't allow these to pass, so I busted out the hammer-n-dolly set to correct the issue. 'Was able to shape it into a resemblance of what I felt on The 5-O. Not certain how this development on Ol' Blue came about, but it appeared to isolated so I moved on. I'll do a few measurements once the body and frame are mated once again. Lots of taping ensued:


Once I was reasonably satisfied I opened the material boxes. Due to regulation, they must ship these to ya in separate containers. So there was a box for the primer and its stuff, the DX basecoat and then a third for the clear. Prepared the gun, etc:


Only to discover that the little device I use to extract paint from a can cleanly has grown legs. Uuuggghhh. Take note of the above picture. It won't look that clean and presentable by the end of the night. Kinda par for the course with the whole painting thing, but I digress. So I laid down a couple of coats of the primer/sealer:


Came out ok, but I was getting-the-feel for how this particular new gun shoots for most of the time I was applying this white stuff. Anyway, I decided that for reasons involving time and since this gun, which I purchased with the full intent of it being the primer/clear mechanism, comes with both a 1.3 and 1.8 tip and needle, that I'd just use it for all three tasks. That would involve less cleaning overall, but would extend the time required by just a bit. So at that point I gave the DeVilbliss a lacquer thinner bath, whipped up the DX paint and loaded it into the gun. Applied the two coats of the base to the firewall:


And jotted back inside to prep the clear. The Darkness was upon me like no one's business. Prep'd the gun and applied the final two coats, this time of the clear:


In the end I completed this step in the darkness with only the backlight from the workshop to guide me around the canvas. It came out ok-ish, but I won't really know until I see it in the sunlight tomorrow. I almost don't wanna look, but will because I have to. laugh However it appears, that is the way it'll remain (unless anything major crops up) for I must move forward with the build. Remember the workbench picture that was relatively clean (well "clean" for me anyway)? Well this is how it typically appears at the end of a painting session:


Ah memories. laugh I think I've mentioned this previously, but I haven't laid down any serious paint in quite a while now. That is a large part of the reason I decided to paint Ol' Blue myself: the opportunity to do something that I haven't done for a few years. While today was hardly serious painting, the process was the same, so it was kinda fun to get back in the saddle again as the saying goes. During the course of the day I discovered a few things that had fallen off of the radar in regard to painting in general (or at least my experience with it):

1) However much you have in the way of supplies, you don't have enough. You'll need more towels than that, more gloves than you have and especially more lacquer thinner than is on-hand.
2) Have a means of pouring from a gallon "bucket" or else contend with a mess on your workbench. And have a workbench or other suitable place (preferably stainless) where you can pour and mix your stuff.
3) Clean everything. Then clean again. Then some more.
4) No matter how arduously you try to keep-it-clean, it's a-gonna get messy. 'Just a question of degree really.
5) Overspray is a-gonna go everywhere and get on everything. So if you paint indoors cover whatever is sitting nearby-ish if you don't want paint on it. That is the one advantage to outdoor painting: not much to get paint on, depending on where you do the painting of course.
6) Wear a respirator, specifically keep that thing snug to your face. Just one whiff of 2K paint products is more than I wanna experience. You won't die from it mind you but just the same, tighten your respirator. Well you won't die today anyway, at least not from the paint. laugh
7) Have a decent air supply system in-place and ready to go. It should include some means of water filtration. Even a cheap-o disposable HF inline filter (which I use as a third backup) helps.
8) Configure and use some means of testing your fan pattern prior to actually spraying anything. Today I used the plastic sheeting that covers the windshield, for example.
9) Expect imperfections. Hey, they're a-gonna happen. Know how to deal with them and then deal with them.
10) Know when to stop.

Ok a-gonna stop typing now. Hope all is well!


Edited by av8or1 (08/09/21 02:03 AM)
_________________________
2010 CVPI (Former TEXAS Highway Patrol vehicle) POTM April 2020 POTM June 2021 double thumbs
2006 LX Sport air ride delete (2)
2006 F450 SD 6.0L PSD CC LWB flatbed 4x4
1985 Mazda RX7 GSL-SE
1970 Plymouth Road Runner A383 pistol grip tick-tock buckets

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#4117616 - 08/09/21 07:46 AM Re: Jerry's Crown Victorias [Re: av8or1]
Old_Guy_Stu Offline

Over the Hill

Registered: 04/28/19
Posts: 2557
Loc: Cleveland, OH
That's one sexy firewall!
_________________________

1988 CVLX Formal Roof (Love Boat) POTM July 2019 & Aug 2020, 56K
E-code lights w/ relays, LEDs w/ switchbacks, 15x8 Ansen slots w/ 255/60 BFG's, Kenwood stereo, various hacks.

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#4117662 - 08/09/21 12:47 PM Re: Jerry's Crown Victorias [Re: av8or1]
Packman Offline
Climber

Registered: 01/17/07
Posts: 850
Loc: Joisey
That firewall is beautiful!

I partially painted my firewall with DupliColor Royal Blue. My 351W completely obscures it, but it was nice when it was exposed.

I chose the bedliner route when I painted the frame of my '86 CV. I felt justyfied using it because that car will see so few miles each year. And for the time being, it won't see wet weather until I figure out a solution for the broken wiper motor.

If that car were to see wet weather; I would have primed the frame; put a coating of POR15 on top of that; and then sprayed some paint of my choice on top of that. Perhaps overkill, but I can't rely on POR15 by itself.
_________________________
Bop Your head and stomp your feet!
Droppin' it nicely, droppin' it neat!

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#4117702 - 08/09/21 07:13 PM Re: Jerry's Crown Victorias [Re: av8or1]
357cvpi Offline
n00b

Registered: 11/13/20
Posts: 40
Loc: UT
Thanks for the undercoat clarification, didn't know what the problem with the rubberized stuff was. It has always annoyed me to no end that automakers can't see fit to even blow some primer on so many parts under the car (rear differential for example). Used to be they even plated the hardware for corrosion resistance.

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#4117710 - 08/09/21 09:12 PM Re: Jerry's Crown Victorias [Re: Packman]
Old_Guy_Stu Offline

Over the Hill

Registered: 04/28/19
Posts: 2557
Loc: Cleveland, OH
Originally Posted By Packman

If that car were to see wet weather; I would have primed the frame; put a coating of POR15 on top of that; and then sprayed some paint of my choice on top of that. Perhaps overkill, but I can't rely on POR15 by itself.


POR15 only sticks to bare metal. It just sits on top of paint, and you can peel it off. But it bonds real nice to stripped, sanded and acid-etched steel. But that's a real PITA with the body on.

@357cvpi: My Ranger came with painted rear axle, driveshaft and frame. Looked real nice on Day One. The paint lasted about two winters. Not sure what the point was.
_________________________

1988 CVLX Formal Roof (Love Boat) POTM July 2019 & Aug 2020, 56K
E-code lights w/ relays, LEDs w/ switchbacks, 15x8 Ansen slots w/ 255/60 BFG's, Kenwood stereo, various hacks.

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#4119034 - 08/22/21 10:38 PM Re: Jerry's Crown Victorias [Re: av8or1]
av8or1 Offline

Over the Hill

Registered: 10/18/17
Posts: 1500
Loc: TX
Well fellas I have been offline busy with other stuff for the past week-plus. Work has been its usual crazy self but the extra-cirricular business was consumed for a tad bit by continued braking issues with Da Beast. 'Pedal just wouldn't stop travelling all the way to the floor the second you touched it. After taking another look under-hood I noticed that the hydroboost was leaking too. Gheez but I was hoping to get away with just a master cylinder replacement and a system bleed. Then came three new calipers. Now a new hydro:


And if that wasn't enough, the pedal refused to cooperate even after that was installed. Had the wife-eee press that critter up-n-down while I went bottom-side for a look-see. Turns out the rear caliper on the driver's side was bad too, despite its bleeder being willing to open-n-close. Uuuugggghhh. Alright so I bought a fourth caliper and installed the speedies on all 4 now-new clampers. Cool. However as I went to install the last-of-the-new fellas:


I noticed the following:


Uhhhhh....yeah. Think I ought to have run it like that? rofl

Uuuugggghhhhh again. And so out came the axle, hub and what was left of that rotor. All too soon I had it replaced:


Doing so reminded me why big-rig mechanics typically earn more than their vehicular counterparts. Every last thing about that job was H-E-A-V-Y, then heavy some more. Par for the course with a rig like this. Anyway, I then bled the system and wouldn't ya know it but the brakes work better than they ever have since I've owned it. Duh! Just sayin'. I do know that the rotor wasn't like that when I first purchased the truck. So the stickage came along at some point thereafter. I just didn't bother to check it, mostly 'cause things were working. Furthermore, I have a dream truck build on the horizon dontchaknow and had been hoping to delay this type of repair until that build. However Ol' Blue has morphed into such an oddessey in and of itself that too much time has gone by. And now these types of issues are bubbling to the surface on their own. 'Definitely need to finish Ol' Blue.

Speaking of that, I did manage to circle the wagons back 'round to the ol' girl late this week. The primary item on the agenda was to source replacement hose for the fuel tank pressure sensor. So I found a specialty outfit online that sells this purported new-fangled hose that does everything under the sun. 'Decided to give it a try. It arrived on Friday and so I had the opportunity to give it a look-over. And hmmmmm....well the quality was definitely present. Made in the USA to boot:


However they sent the wrong size and try as I might I couldn't make it work. And it was yellow. Therefore with little more than a wave of the hand, I dismissed it to one of the misc parts storage cabinets. I then did what I likely should have done in the first place. 'Went to a local auto parts store and asked to see their 5/8" (ID) hydraulic hose. They cut me off about 2' and I brought it home. Then with a little slicing-n-dicing and some hose clamps, this is what I ended up with:


And:


Should do the job, which is to direct fuel vapor to the cannister while preventing the associated odor from entering the cabin. Let's hope to kingdom come that the latter comes to pass, for if it fails the wiff-test, sure as we're standing/sitting here, I'll need to pull the tank again. laugh

And with that The Darkness showed itself. Again. The plan now is to install the bloomin' tank onto the body ASAP so that I can finally mount the body back to the frame. I digress. Anyway that's all I have for tonight. Hope all is well!


Edited by av8or1 (08/22/21 10:47 PM)
_________________________
2010 CVPI (Former TEXAS Highway Patrol vehicle) POTM April 2020 POTM June 2021 double thumbs
2006 LX Sport air ride delete (2)
2006 F450 SD 6.0L PSD CC LWB flatbed 4x4
1985 Mazda RX7 GSL-SE
1970 Plymouth Road Runner A383 pistol grip tick-tock buckets

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#4119338 - 08/25/21 10:50 PM Re: Jerry's Crown Victorias [Re: av8or1]
av8or1 Offline

Over the Hill

Registered: 10/18/17
Posts: 1500
Loc: TX
Alright fellas, an update. I'll begin with work that I completed last week actually but didn't include in the previous post. The firewall. Well, in the end it came out ok. Ish. I achieved the looks-good-from-five-feet-away goal:


And so I can't complain. Given the outdoor conditions on a windy day that I was in at the time, well, you take what you get when you decide to press-ahead with your paint work. And I won't even mention the painting-in-the-dark business. There is too much orange peel for my tastes, but you have to get up on it to see it, so that isn't so bad. If it was the body of the vehicle, no way, I wouldn't let that pass. However it's the firewall and most of it will disappear underneath the various bits-n-pieces, so it will receive the thumbs up on that basis. I then turned my attention to the tranny tunnel heat shield. I didn't like the idea of branding Nasqua all over the thing, so I set about cleaning, scuffing and painting it:


Ick. I think I liked it better with the friggin Nasqua written all over it. laugh Oh well, it is what it is now. While the tape did inject a tad of rigidity to the overall structure, the shield will droop like no one's business when mounted. I used a few strips of tape to hold it up for the picture:


However I am not a fan of the excessive droop. So I may apply some of the spray-stick to help hold it in position. TBD.

That done, I moved on to the fuel tank, for when that is installed I can finally reunite the body with the frame! The first thing that needed addressing were the old straps. They were bunged up upon removal somehow, I don't recall now. laugh While I could have bent them back into serviceable condition, why? I just took the undamaged ones from the CVPI tank that I purchased from the fella who keeps several of these parts cars sitting around his property (and from whom we bought The 5-O). More on that in a minute. If you aren't familiar with how the straps do their thing, on the bottom they are held in a retaining bracket that is welded to the body of your Panther. The retaining mechanism is a rudimentary pin-through-a-loop:


You can remove the pin through the larger hole in the bracket as seen on the right in the above picture. You do so via a small-ish screwdriver or punch that you send through the smaller hole in the bracket on the left side. At the top you have these studs:


Where the old ones are on the left and the new replacements are on the right. Once the tank is secured, the lower portion of these studs are broken off at the indentation. Those studs are threaded into captives that are installed in the body's rear crossmember:


And that arrangement is the means by which your tank has a home. Back to the build. Generally, my goal for tonight was to install the tank. So I began with the straps from the aforementioned CVPI:


Part number for the morbidly curious:


And of course dontchaknow that I just HAD to clean, sand, prime and paint them:


As if that wasn't excessive enough, I cleaned and painted the pins too, I mean why not? I'm here. And with that, I dunno fellas. Painting the fuel tank straps and pins? I may have officially gone plum-tip-toed-crazy with this build. laugh Anyway the tank installed:


I did take a brief look at the wiring diagrams for the fuel pump and tank. However there doesn't appear to be an excessive amount of access restriction once the frame is in place, so I may defer that work until after the big event. TBD. I do plan on removing the wiring that ran to the original air suspension from this loom and from the loom that runs to the front of the body. I have alternate plans for eliminating the "Check Air Suspension" message that appears on the display. More on that later. I need to help get the lil' un to sleep.

Hope all is well!


Edited by av8or1 (08/25/21 11:59 PM)
_________________________
2010 CVPI (Former TEXAS Highway Patrol vehicle) POTM April 2020 POTM June 2021 double thumbs
2006 LX Sport air ride delete (2)
2006 F450 SD 6.0L PSD CC LWB flatbed 4x4
1985 Mazda RX7 GSL-SE
1970 Plymouth Road Runner A383 pistol grip tick-tock buckets

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